My Wife Is Fetish, Separate Us, Husband Begs Court

The woman standing there, my Lord, I mean my wife is a devil, she jumps from one herbalist to another, she is diabolically wicked. She once called me on the phone while I was away on travel that she will kill my daughter who is her step child”

” I am tired of her. She will kill me one day”

A 52 year old truck driver, Adesuyi Omole told an Ikare Akoko Customary Court while defending himself in a divorce suit filed against him in the court by his wife, Adesuyi Odunayo.

Adesuyi stated that his wife is fond of disrespecting his family members and fights them at the slightest opportunity.

“I am happy that she was the one that is asking for this dissolution, she is free to go” Adesuyi declared.

He however denied the claims brought against her by her wife.

“On her claim that I don’t take care of her, it is a gross lie my Lord. Whenever I buy clothes for her I also buy for her mother, I mean my mother-in-law. I always male sure that there is food in the house and also provide for all her needs”

Adesuyi also told the court that his  wife denied him access to the only child of the marriage, six year old Adesuyi Emmanuel.

The defendant however informed the court that her wife has returned the dowry price which he paid on her.

Mrs Adesuyi Odunayo, a 41 year old house wife had approached the court seeking an end to her six year old marriage with the defendant.

She was seeking the dissolution on the grounds of frequent fighting, lack of care for herself and the only issue of the marriage, threat to life and no rest of mind.

After listening to the statements of the two parties, the court president, Mr S.S. Rotimi with whom was Mr Francis Gbiri granted the prayers of the plaintiff.

In its judgement, the court stated that the love between the two has faded and that it cannot bound together two unwilling partners and therefore dissolved the marriage.

It ordered that the only child of the marriage, a six year old boy who has been in the custody of the plaintiff should continue to be there since his father, Adesuyi Omole is not settled.

It also ordered that the defendant should be paying a monthly feeding allowance for the child with effect from November 30, 2017.

The plaintiff was also ordered to be taking the child to a government hospital and obtaining receipts in respect of treatment whenever he is sick.

The defendant was however told to come to court via a summons when he is stable and ready to take custody of the child.

A 30 day right of appeal was however given to any of the party who is not satisfied with the judgment.

Pastor Married Me With Charm, Wife Tells Court

“My Lord, this man made me to undertake a blood covenant with him. He brought a kolanut with three lobes and gave me one to keep and himself took one. He also took my blood by cutting my skin with a razor in a container while he dipped the remaining lobe in the blood and we both ate it and now he is here to abandon me.”

A 30-year-old house wife, Mrs Samuel Toyin told an Ikare Akoko customary court in her defense in a divorce suit brought against her by her husband, one Pastor Samuel Ojo,

Mrs Ojo also told the Court that her husband deceived her into believing that she is the third wife he would be marrying only to discover that she is number nine when she was six months pregnant.

“My Lord, please save me from this heartless man who is fond of dumping women at will and also using them for ritual purposes. He want to dump me now that he has achieved his aim. I am under covenant with him and I am afraid something evil may happen, please save me from him,  she pleaded with the court.

Mr Samuel Ojo, a 43-yea- old man who claimed to be the founder and pastor of living Church, IkareAkoko had approached the court seeking to dissolve his two-year old marriage with his wife, Toyin on the grounds of frequent fighting, harassment,  and no rest of mind.

Pastor Samuel while stating his case before the court stated that his wife is always in the habit of fighting him whenever she sets her eyes on him and also tears his clothes at will.

The plaintiff, also told the court that the defendant always bite her whenever she fights him.

My Lord, this woman always fights me anytime she sees me, she tears my clothes at will and always bite me whenever she fights me. She also seized my motorcycle and thereby prevented me from carrying out my duties’

However, the wife in her reply to the claims of her husband denied all the allegations against her. She equally denied ever seizing his motorcycle but told the court that it was the plaintiff who kept same with her.

In its judgment, the court observed that at the initial stage of his statement, the plaintiff, Pastor Samuel Ojo lied in his testimony that he has three wives but later told the court that he is a husband to 20 wives that the wife told the court that her husband made her to believe she is the third wife but later realized that she is number nine only six months to her pregnancy.

It was also observed by the court that the plaintiff is fond of marrying women and dumping them after rendering them useless to themselves and the society.

The court also stated that it is privy to the fact that one of the women dumped by theplaintiff is now partially insane as he has made her overthink.

The court in his observation also stated that the only child of the union is a year and three months and it is against the Customary Court laws of Ondo State to divorce such persons and that he deceived the defendant to marry him when they were courting.

The Court therefore refused to grant the application of the plaintiff as his request was turned down.

According to the Court, the marriage could not be dissolved until the child is three years old when he could be weaned.

The Court also ordered that the plaintiff should pay the sum of N26, 000.00 to the defendant being the cost of her house rent starting from November this year and the same pay to the court registry to be collected by the defendant until she remarries.

The court also ordered the plaintiff to be paying a monthly feeding; allowance of N5, 000.00 for the child.

In the same vein, the court also ordered the plaintiff to be paying a monthly electricity bill for the defendant among others.

However, a 30-day-right of appeal was given to any of the party who is not satisfied with the judgment.

My Husband Is A Lazy Man, Wife Tells Court

A Customary Court in Mapo, Ibadan, on Tuesday dissolved a 21 year-old marriage between one Ibrahim Tajudeen and his wife Idowu over laziness and irresponsibility.

The President of the court Mr Ademola Odunade, who granted Idowu’s request for dissolution of the marriage, said a peaceful coexistence between husband and wife was necessary in any marriage.

“It is our duty as a court to ensure peace wherever there is trouble.

“The union between Idowu and Ibrahim has ceased to be henceforth.

“Custody of the three children produced by the union is awarded to Ibrahim,” Odunade said.

Narrating her case, Idowu, a mother of three, told the court that Ibrahim was a lazy  and irresponsible man.

“My lord, Ibrahim is so lazy to the extent that even when I took it upon myself to get him a job, he chose to be lazy.

“I have tried times without number to ensure that he is productively engaged, but Ibrahim kept telling me that he is not strong.

“Besides, he is so troublesome that I can no more cope with his troubles.

“Worst still, I have been reduced to almost nothing because Ibrahim does not give the children and I any form of care. He neither clothes our nakedness nor does he provide for our food, we are just there.

“I am principally responsible for the children’s education and other needs.”

She said she was also responsible for the payment of the house rent since 2016.

“There is no more love between us, please, separate us,” Idowu pleaded.

However, Ibrahim denied all the allegations  against him and rejected the divorce suit.

“My Lord, I have a well established car wash service and so it is not true that I am lazy.

“I provide Idowu’s needs according to my capability.

“I have been responsible for everything in the house and I will continue to perform my duty,” Ibrahim said.

Thousands Rally For Gay Marriage Legislation In Australian

Thousands of people rallied around Australia on Saturday urging the legalization of same-sex marriage, one week before final ballots can be submitted in a contentious postal survey on the issue that has divided the country.

The largest crowd was in Sydney, where organizers said between 5,000 and 10,000 people gathered in front of Central Station before marching along one of the city’s biggest roads to Victoria Park.

“It’s a good reflection of the enthusiasm of people,” Australian Marriage Equality’s Tiernan Brady said. “They are very determined, very positive and not complacent.”

Other rallies in favor of same-sex marriage were held in the northern city of Brisbane and the central hub of Alice Springs.

Rallies organized by the Coalition for Marriage, the lead campaigner against same-sex marriage, also were held across the country.

The coalition, which includes the Australian Christian Lobby and other religious groups, encouraged those who haven’t returned their surveys to do so.

“We’re so pleased so many people have engaged with this process and we encourage those who haven’t to tick ‘no’ and put it in the post,” spokeswoman Monica Doumit said.

Though the postal ballot is non-binding, a “yes” vote is expected to lead to the legalization of same-sex marriage which could further fracture the government of Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Ballots were mailed out from Sept. 12, with the Australian Bureau of Statistics recommending all votes be returned via the postal service by Oct. 27.

The latest update from the ABS, issued on Oct. 17, showed almost 11 million postal votes had been returned, about 68 per cent of the total distributed.

The result is expected on Nov. 15.

England Records 106,959 Marriage Divorce In 2016

The number of divorces last year in England and Wales was the highest since 2009, official figures show.

There were 106,959 divorces of opposite-sex couples in 2016 - an increase of 5.8% from 2015. It was the biggest year-on-year rise since 1985, when there was a jump of 10.9%.

Of 112 divorces of same-sex couples in 2016, 78% involved female couples.

Charity Relate said rising levels of household debt and stagnating wages could be putting a strain on marriages.

For those in opposite-sex marriages, the divorce rate was highest for women in their 30s and men aged between 45 and 49.

Overall, there were 8.9 divorces per 1,000 married men and women.

ONS spokeswoman Nicola Haines said: "Although the number of divorces of opposite-sex couples in England and Wales increased by 5.8% in 2016 compared with 2015, the number remains 30% lower than the most recent peak in 2003; divorce rates for men and women have seen similar changes."

2016 was only the second year that same-sex divorces have been possible.

The most common reason for divorce was "unreasonable behaviour", with 51% of women and 36% of men citing it in their divorce petitions. Unreasonable behaviour can include having a sexual relationship with someone else.

Overall, women initiated proceedings in 61% of opposite-sex divorces.

Commenting on the figures, Chris Sherwood, chief executive of the relationship support charity Relate, said: "It is unclear as to why there was a slight increase in divorces in 2016 and as to whether this rise will continue or not.

"We know that money worries are one of the top strains on relationships and it may be that rising levels of household debt and stagnating pay growth could be contributing factors."

However, he stressed that the overall trend over the past few years had been downward.

He added: "Divorce is not something that people tend to take lightly but our research suggests that many people could have saved their marriage and avoided divorce with the right support.

"That is why we would encourage anybody experiencing relationship issues to access support such as counselling at the earliest possible stage."

Unfaithful Married Women Rate Increased By 40% - Report

One of the more interesting facts in Esther Perel's new book, State of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity, comes near the beginning.

Since 1990, notes the psychoanalyst and writer, the rate of married women who report they've been unfaithful has increased by 40 percent, while the rate among men has remained the same.
 
More women than ever are cheating, she tells us, or are willing to admit that they are cheating -- and while Perel spends much of her book examining the psychological meaning, motivation, and impact of these affairs, she offers little insight into the significance of the rise itself.
 
So what exactly is happening inside marriages to shift the numbers? What has changed about monogamy or family life in the past 27 years to account for the closing gap? And why have so many women begun to feel entitled to the kind of behavior long accepted (albeit disapprovingly) as a male prerogative?
 
These questions first occurred to me a few years ago when I began to wonder how many of my friends were actually faithful to their husbands.
From a distance, they seemed happy enough, or at least content. Like me, they were doing the family thing. They had cute kids, mortgages, busy social lives, matching sets of dishes. On the surface, their husbands were reasonable, the marriages modern and equitable. If these women friends were angry unfulfilled or resentful, they didn't show it.
 
Then one day, one of them confided in me she'd been having two overlapping affairs over the course of five years.
Almost before I'd finished processing this, another friend told me she was 100 percent faithful to her husband, except when she was out of town for work each month. Not long after, another told me that while she'd never had sex with another man, she'd had so many emotional affairs and inappropriate email correspondences over the years that she'd had to buy a separate hard drive to store them all.
 
What surprised me most about these conversations was not that my friends were cheating, but that many of them were so nonchalant in the way they described their extramarital adventures. There was deception but little secrecy or shame.
 
Often, they loved their husbands, but felt in some fundamental way that their needs (sexual, emotional, psychological) were not being met inside the marriage. Some even wondered if their husbands knew about their infidelity, choosing to look away.
 
"The fact is," one of these friends told me, "I'm nicer to my husband when I have something special going on that's just for me." She found that she was kinder, more patient, less resentful, "less of a bitch." It occurred to me as I listened that these women were describing infidelity not as a transgression but a creative or even subversive act, a protest against an institution they'd come to experience as suffocating or oppressive.
 
In an earlier generation, this might have taken the form of separation or divorce, but now, it seemed, more and more women were unwilling to abandon the marriages and families they'd built over years or decades. They were also unwilling to bear the stigma of a publicly open marriage or to go through the effort of negotiating such a complex arrangement.
 
These women were turning to infidelity not as a way to explode a marriage, but as a way to stay in it. Whereas conventional narratives of female infidelity so often posit the unfaithful woman as a passive party, the women I talked to seemed in control of their own transgressions. There seemed to be something new about this approach.
 
In The Secret Life of the Cheating Wife: Power, Pragmatism, and Pleasure in Women's Infidelity, another book on infidelity to be published this November, the sociologist Alicia Walker elaborates on the concept of female infidelity as a subversion of traditional gender roles.
 
To do so, she interviews 40 women who sought or participated in extramarital relationships through the Ashley Madison dating site.
Like The State of Affairs, Walker's text offers valuable insight simply by way of approaching its subject from a position of curiosity as opposed to prevention or recovery, and she investigates which factors led the women in her study to go outside their marriages.
 
Surely, one might think, a woman who would do such a thing must be acting out of a desire to escape a miserable marriage. And yet it turns out, this isn't always the case: Many of the women Walker interviewed were in marriages that were functional. Like the women I knew who cheated, many of the interviewees said they liked their husbands well enough. They had property together. They had friendships together. They had children that they were working together to raise.
 
But at the same time, they found married life incredibly dull and constraining and resented the fact that as women, they felt they consistently did a disproportionate amount of the invisible labor that went into maintaining their lifestyle.
 
One woman in Walker's book told her, "The inequality of it all is such an annoying factor that I am usually in a bad mood when my spouse is in my presence," and another said that while her husband was a competent adult in the world, at home he felt like "another child to clean up after."
 
Many of the friends I spoke to expressed similar feelings. "I shop and cook, my husband does dishes and empties the trash," one told me. "We each do our own laundry. But I've always been in charge of the 'calendar,' and what I didn't realize until recently is that in some way I'm in charge of managing many of our relationships.
 
My husband is a homebody and I initiate/plan almost all of our social endeavors. My mom got this phrase from her therapist: 'keeping the pulse of the household' this idea that someone has to be managing the emotional heart of your tiny community. I think women do that a lot."
And as Perel repeats frequently in this book, and in her previous one, little does as much to muffle erotic desire as this kind of caretaking and enmeshment.
 
"I think there's an incredible amount of deep resentment for women in America about divisions of labor," said sociologist Lisa Wade when I asked her to comment on this contradiction. "And what social scientists are finding now is that there is a correlation between equal division of labor and better sex."
 
No matter how much attention is paid to these issues, she told me, "these kind of cultural beliefs hang on a long time after they're relevant. They hang on in ways that are often invisible. A lot of women have tried to address these problems and have faced a lot of stubbornness from husbands. They feel there's no way to win this battle. So maybe now what women are deciding is that infidelity is a third way."
 
Of course, it's a "third way" that is not feasible for everyone, even if more women are taking it up, usually women who feel financially secure and independent enough to risk potential fallout. These women seem to be finding that no amount of sensitivity or goodwill on the part of their husbands can save them from the fact that in every arena, from work to marriage to parenthood, they're always doing more for less.
 
As Wade put it, "It's such a precarious balance keeping everyone happy, that for many women, to start a long conversation about her own sexual satisfaction seems like a bad idea. We now tell women that they can have it all, that they can work and have a family and deserve to be sexually satisfied. And then when having it all is miserable and overwhelming or they realize marriage isn't all it's cracked it up to be, maybe having affairs is the new plan B."
I tested this idea out on a few of the friends who had confided in me about their affairs, and most of them agreed. Twenty or thirty years ago they might have opted for divorce, because surely there was another man out there who could do better in this role, who could satisfy them completely. But a lot of these women are children of divorce. They lived through the difficulties divorce can create.
 
"Even now," all these years later, one told me, "Do you know what my most vivid memory of Christmas is? Driving through a blizzard up I-95 in the back of one of their cars, and then they'd pull over on the side of the highway and hand off me and my brother without speaking. That was our Christmas. Why did these people marry in the first place?"
 
Maybe that's the essential question, the question preceding those Perel explores in her book. Why do women still marry when, if statistics are to be believed, marriage doesn't make them very happy?
I confided in a friend once that, after 15 years of marriage, the institution and the relationship itself continued to mystify me. At the time I married, marriage had felt like a panacea; it was a bond that would provide security, love, friendship, stability, and romance -- the chance to have children and nice dishes, to be introduced as someone's wife. It promised to expand my circle of family and improve my credit score, to tether me to something wholesome and give my life meaning.
 
Could any single relationship not fall short of such expectations? Maybe these women were on to something -- valuing their marriages for the things it could offer and outsourcing the rest, accepting the distance between the idealization and the actual thing, seeing marriage clearly for what it is and not what we're all told and promised it will be.
 
Of course, it's a "third way" that is not feasible for everyone, even if more women are taking it up, usually women who feel financially secure and independent enough to risk potential fallout. These women seem to be finding that no amount of sensitivity or goodwill on the part of their husbands can save them from the fact that in every arena, from work to marriage to parenthood, they're always doing more for less.
 
As Wade put it, "It's such a precarious balance keeping everyone happy, that for many women, to start a long conversation about her own sexual satisfaction seems like a bad idea. We now tell women that they can have it all, that they can work and have a family and deserve to be sexually satisfied. And then when having it all is miserable and overwhelming or they realize marriage isn't all it's cracked it up to be, maybe having affairs is the new plan B."
I tested this idea out on a few of the friends who had confided in me about their affairs, and most of them agreed. Twenty or thirty years ago they might have opted for divorce, because surely there was another man out there who could do better in this role, who could satisfy them completely. But a lot of these women are children of divorce. They lived through the difficulties divorce can create.
 
"Even now," all these years later, one told me, "Do you know what my most vivid memory of Christmas is? Driving through a blizzard up I-95 in the back of one of their cars, and then they'd pull over on the side of the highway and hand off me and my brother without speaking. That was our Christmas. Why did these people marry in the first place?"
 
Maybe that's the essential question, the question preceding those Perel explores in her book. Why do women still marry when, if statistics are to be believed, marriage doesn't make them very happy?
I confided in a friend once that, after 15 years of marriage, the institution and the relationship itself continued to mystify me. At the time I married, marriage had felt like a panacea; it was a bond that would provide security, love, friendship, stability, and romance -- the chance to have children and nice dishes, to be introduced as someone's wife. It promised to expand my circle of family and improve my credit score, to tether me to something wholesome and give my life meaning.
 
Could any single relationship not fall short of such expectations? Maybe these women were on to something -- valuing their marriages for the things it could offer and outsourcing the rest, accepting the distance between the idealization and the actual thing, seeing marriage clearly for what it is and not what we're all told and promised it will be.

Egypt Orders Anal Tests For 6 Homosexuals

Six Egyptian suspected homosexuals, arrested for “promoting sexual deviancy” and “debauchery” on social media will be subjected to anal examinations ahead of their Oct. 1 trial, Amnesty International said on Saturday.

Their arrest is part of a wider crackdown against homosexuality that started last week when a group of people was seen raising a rainbow flag at a concert, a rare public show of support for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights in the conservative Muslim country.

At least 11 people have since been arrested, Amnesty said, and one man has been sentenced to six years in jail after local media launched a highly critical campaign against those who raised the rainbow flag at a Mashrou’ Leila concert, a popular Lebanese alternative rock band whose lead singer is openly gay.

Amnesty said the Forensic Medical Authority was due to subject the six men to anal examinations to determine whether they have had homosexual sex.

Judicial sources said any defendant accused of “debauchery” or “sexual deviancy”, a euphemism for homosexuality in Egypt, is subjected to a medical examination based on an order from the Public Prosecutor.

“Allegations of torturing or insulting those medically examined are lies not worth responding to. The examinations are carried out by a forensic doctor who swore to respect his profession and its ethics,” one judicial source said.

Amnesty said such examinations violate the prohibition of torture and other ill-treatment under international law.

“The fact that Egypt’s Public Prosecutor is prioritizing hunting down people based on their perceived sexual orientation is utterly deplorable. These men should be released immediately and unconditionally – not put on trial,” said Najia Bounaim, North Africa Campaigns Director at Amnesty International.

“Forced anal examinations are abhorrent and amount to torture. The Egyptian authorities have an appalling track record of using invasive physical tests which amount to torture against detainees in their custody. All plans to carry out such tests on these men must be stopped immediately.”

Egypt’s Muslim religious establishment is voicing its support for the government’s moves against homosexuals.

“Al Azhar will stand against calls for sexual perversion the same way it has stood against extremist groups,” a preacher at the 1,000-year-old seat of Sunni Muslim learning said in his Friday prayers sermon.

Although homosexuality is not specifically outlawed in Egypt, it is a conservative society and discrimination is rife. Gay men are frequently arrested and typically charged with debauchery, immorality or blasphemy.

The largest crackdown on homosexuals took place in 2001, when police raided a floating disco called the Queen Boat. Fifty-two men were tried in the case.

Woman Seeks Divorce Over Starvation

A housewife, Hafsat Mohammed, has pleaded with a Sharia Court in Minna to dissolve her marriage because her husband does not provide food in the house.

Mohammed told the court that her husband, Isah Gimba, spends his money on intoxicants rather than take care of the home.

“My husband doesn’t provide food in our house, instead any little money he gets he spends it on things that will intoxicate him.

“The hardship he subjects me to in his house is too much for me, I can’t bear it any more.

“That is why I am pleading with this honourable court to help me out of this hardship by ending the marriage,” she said.

Gimba, however, denied his wife’s allegations, saying he was trying his best to put food on the table for her.

He maintained that he still loved his wife and would not want them to go their separate ways.

The judge, Ahmed Bima, advised the couple to give peace a chance and settle their differences with patience and understanding.

He adjourned the case until Oct. 9 to give room for both parties to reconcile their differences.

Divorce becomes the last option in this case.

About us

The Reflector Newspaper aims at informing and interpreting the news, ranging from politics to economy, technology, entertainment, health, education and foreign issues. We pride on keeping our readers abreast of trending in both national and global issues based on proven facts.

 

..... at The Reflector Newspaper....

...."We Speak the Nation's Mind."

 

Last posts

Newsletter

Subscribe here to get the breaking news as it happen